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Hello there, could any body of you tell me about the best universities for the complete actuarial sciences courses in the US,UK and canada.

zaid
Accounting is not compulsory for Actuarial Sciences.

Best in UK would be LSE, but it only offers BSc. I hope derivativetrader could help you with this one, though.

Don't know much about US and Canada.
Accounting and actuarial sciences are very different fields and its not easy to migrate from one to the other without graying your hair in the process...so choose carefully. In the US the university does not matter one bit. Only exams and experience.
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Tahoma, Arial" id="quote">quote<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by Syed</i>
<br />Accounting and actuarial sciences are very different fields and its not easy to migrate from one to the other without graying your hair in the process...so choose carefully. In the US the university does not matter one bit. Only exams and experience.
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

True

However, I guess Zaid was asking about the degree courses and not SOA, that is why he was asking about university. And according to my knowledge, university ranks counts a lot!
I am graduating from KU in BS Actuarial Science looking for the contacts of those guys giving or gonna to apply for Actuarial Exams.

<b><i><font color="blue"><s>Nadir Hussain</s></font id="blue"></i></b>
I am new to this forum wonna to know if any one is concern with the Actuarial divisions of Sidat haider , Akhtar & Hasan , state life or balla balla.I need to know about the market requirements and the eligibilities in the concerning firms.

Simultaneously with my University education I wonna to give Society's actuarial exams too.

Is there any body in the respective field or somewhat of touch with it.

<b><i><font color="blue"><s>Nadir Hussain</s></font id="blue"></i></b>
yes sumaan is right, i am concerned about the degree courses. i am sill confused about them that what are differences between Bsc,Msc and complete actuarial sciences degree.
because some one told me that actuarial sciences is not a degree, it is just a certificate.


zaid
The one you do from SOA and IOA (just to name a couple) are NOT degree courses but professional modular courses (qualification like CA/ACCA).

The others are degrees. However, you're only an actuary if you've completed the modular courses, i guess. Correct me if I am wrong.
yes, but i still dont get it, tell me the differnece between complete actuarial science program and the one we get from a university, i mean what is the time difference

zaid
yes, but i am still not getting it. just tell me the difference between the complete actuarial science program and the one that is done by the university, for example time difference

zaid
<blockquote id="quote"><font size="1" face="Verdana, Tahoma, Arial" id="quote">quote<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"><i>Originally posted by zaid</i>
<br />just tell me the difference between the complete actuarial science program and the one that is done by the university
<hr height="1" noshade id="quote"></font id="quote"></blockquote id="quote">

To qualify as an actuary by most organisations, such as Institute and Society, you need to pass all their exams plus fulfill work experience requirements. The Institute, at the moment, has 3 years of work experience requirement. On average they say it takes 5-8 years to pass all those exams and able to get the relevant experience.

Some people also do bachelors or masters in actuarial sciences which enable them to gain some exemptions out of those exams set by the actuarial bodies (IOA/SOA).

So, to call yourself an actuary you need to pass all exams by the bodies and gain relevant work experience. If you manage to get exemptions through your BSc or MSc then you will qualify sooner.

Hope it clarify the confusion.

DT
As a clarification, SOA has no exemptions for Msc., PhD, Mphil, etc. etc!
But, SOA offers exemptions to BSc and MSc in Actuarial Sciences students.
Thats very interesting, and news to me. Can you please reference a link or something, so we can know what exams are exempt?
Hello Derivative Trader,

have you been in Pakistan last month or so, i thought i met you.
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